Underwater Photography Underwater photography is very tricky and presents many unique challenges before you produce decent photographs. By far the most challenging thing to get right is colour balance. Water absorbs different wavelengths of light the deeper you go and your photos will appear bluer and greener with greater depth. Fortunately as a snorkeller you probably won't be going too deep, but you will still need to adjust the white balance by adding varying amounts of red, orange or yellow. The other most challenging thing is movement; not only will you be trying to photograph a moving subject but you will be hand-holding the camera while being moved around by the water too. It requires patience, practice and disappointment before you start taking good underwater photographs. We started taking photos using point-and-shoot cameras and so always set the camera white balance to the Underwater setting. We have now progressed to the Canon G1X Mk II and always shoot using RAW so that we can best adjust the white balance on the computer later. Even when taking RAW photos, we set the camera white balance to the Underwater setting because when taking video the camera uses this white balance setting. All of our photos, RAW and JPEG, have been adjusted on a computer so that the true colours are presented. Our Book: A Snorkeller’s Guide to Common Fishes of Ningaloo Reef We have written a book which can be previewed and purchased from this web site: A Snorkeller’s Guide to Common Fishes of Ningaloo Reef

Our Second Book: A Snorkeller’s Guide to Ningaloo Reef - Fishes, Corals & Snorkel Spots

We have released the second edition of our book and have changed the title to reflect the additions we have made to the book. A preview can be seen here.
Keith & Vlasta Ross-Jones
© Keith Ross-Jones
Underwater Photography Underwater photography is very tricky and presents many unique challenges before you produce decent photographs. By far the most challenging thing to get right is colour balance. Water absorbs different wavelengths of light the deeper you go and your photos will appear bluer and greener with greater depth. Fortunately as a snorkeller you probably won't be going too deep, but you will still need to adjust the white balance by adding varying amounts of red, orange or yellow. The other most challenging thing is movement; not only will you be trying to photograph a moving subject but you will be hand-holding the camera while being moved around by the water too. It requires patience, practice and disappointment before you start taking good underwater photographs. We started taking photos using point-and-shoot cameras and so always set the camera white balance to the Underwater setting. We have now progressed to the Canon G1X Mk II and always shoot using RAW so that we can best adjust the white balance on the computer later. Even when taking RAW photos, we set the camera white balance to the Underwater setting because when taking video the camera uses this white balance setting. All of our photos, RAW and JPEG, have been adjusted on a computer so that the true colours are presented. Our Book: A Snorkeller’s Guide to Common Fishes of Ningaloo Reef We have written a book which can be previewed and purchased from this web site: A Snorkeller’s Guide to Common Fishes of Ningaloo Reef

Our Second Book: A Snorkeller’s Guide to Ningaloo

Reef - Fishes, Corals & Snorkel Spots

We have released the second edition of our book and have changed the title to reflect the additions we have made to the book. A preview can be seen here.
© Keith Ross-Jones
Keith & Vlasta Ross-Jones